5 Books on My Summer Reading List



Happy Saturday, Santinis! I've rediscovered my my long-lost love of reading. Once upon time, I was an avid reader. It was one of my favorite hobbies. So much so, I was part of a book club that met on Friday evenings. I thought after grad school I would get back into "leisurely reading." One year passed, then two...It's been four years since I graduated from grad school and that moment finally arrived. Hallelujah!! It's about time too, because I never stopped buying books. Needless to say, I have a lot of catching up to do. So, here are the 5 books on my reading list for the summer.



1] These Ghosts Are Family by Maisy Card

Description: These Ghosts Are Family revolves around the consequences of Abel’s decision and tells the story of the Paisley family from colonial Jamaica to present-day Harlem. There is Vera, whose widowhood forced her into the role of a single mother. There are two daughters and a granddaughter who have never known they are related. And there are others, like the houseboy who loved Vera, whose lives might have taken different courses if not for Abel Paisley’s actions.


2] The Yellow House by Sarah M. Broom

Description: A book of great ambition, Sarah M. Broom’s The Yellow House tells a hundred years of her family and their relationship to home in a neglected area of one of America’s most mythologized cities. This is the story of a mother’s struggle against a house’s entropy, and that of a prodigal daughter who left home only to reckon with the pull that home exerts, even after the Yellow House was wiped off the map after Hurricane Katrina.The Yellow House expands the map of New Orleans to include the stories of its lesser known natives, guided deftly by one of its native daughters, to demonstrate how enduring drives of clan, pride, and familial love resist and defy erasure. Located in the gap between the “Big Easy” of tourist guides and the New Orleans in which Broom was raised, The Yellow House is a brilliant memoir of place, class, race, the seeping rot of inequality, and the internalized shame that often follows. It is a transformative, deeply moving story from an unparalleled new voice of startling clarity, authority, and power.


3] Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America by Michael Eric Dyson

Description: As the country grapples with racist division at a level not seen since the 1960s, one man's voice soars above the rest with conviction and compassion. In his 2016New York Times op-ed piece "Death in Black and White," Michael Eric Dyson moved a nation. Now he continues to speak out inTears We Cannot Stop―a provocative and deeply personal call for change. Dyson argues that if we are to make real racial progress we must face difficult truths, including being honest about how black grievance has been ignored, dismissed, or discounted.


4] The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett

Description: The Vignes twin sisters will always be identical. But after growing up together in a small, southern black community and running away at age sixteen, it's not just the shape of their daily lives that is different as adults, it's everything: their families, their communities, their racial identities. Many years later, one sister lives with her black daughter in the same southern town she once tried to escape. The other secretly passes for white, and her white husband knows nothing of her past. Still, even separated by so many miles and just as many lies, the fates of the twins remain intertwined. What will happen to the next generation, when their own daughters' storylines intersect?


5] The Girl Who Smiled Beads by Clemantine Wamariya

Description: Clemantine Wamariya was six years old when her mother and father began to speak in whispers, when neighbors began to disappear, and when she heard the loud, ugly sounds her brother said were thunder. In 1994, she and her fifteen-year-old sister, Claire, fled the Rwandan massacre and spent the next six years migrating through seven African countries, searching for safety—perpetually hungry, imprisoned and abused, enduring and escaping refugee camps, finding unexpected kindness, witnessing inhuman cruelty. They did not know whether their parents were dead or alive.


When Clemantine was twelve, she and her sister were granted refugee status in the United States; there, in Chicago, their lives diverged. Though their bond remained unbreakable, Claire, who had for so long protected and provided for Clemantine, was a single mother struggling to make ends meet, while Clemantine was taken in by a family who raised her as their own. She seemed to live the American dream: attending private school, taking up cheerleading, and, ultimately, graduating from Yale. Yet the years of being treated as less than human, of going hungry and seeing death, could not be erased. She felt at the same time six years old and one hundred years old.



Well Santinis, that's it! What are you currently reading? Let me know if decide to read any of these books. Or just share other good books with me to read. Enjoy your week!


Hey Santinis!

I'm Santeka - an outspoken, over the top Southern Girl that landed in New Jersey with an appetite for fun, flavor, travel, and new experiences. Thanks for stopping by. I hope you enjoy exploring all of the things I love and feel inspired along the way! 

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